World Child Cancer supports the training of Paediatric Oncology Pharmacists in Ghana​

World Child Cancer is working with its partners in Ghana to upgrade the Paediatric Oncology Unit of the Child Health Department of Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, to a Centre of excellence for paediatric oncology in West Africa, which will provide universal, accessible and locally-owned cancer services.

World Child Cancer has signed an MoU with the Ghana College of Physicians and Surgeons (GCPS) for the training of Paediatric Oncologists locally, with support from twining partners. So far, nine residents including a Sierra Leonean and a Liberian are under training. We have also signed an MoU with the Ghana College of Nurses and Midwives for a one-year course on Paediatric Oncology Nursing with eighteen residents which started in October this year.

Ghana College of Pharmacy World Child Cancer
Ghana College of Pharmacy contract signing with World Child Cancer

According to The World Health Organisation (WHO), skilled multi-disciplinary teams are required for cancer management. Without them, technology cannot be effectively used for the management of childhood cancers and the late diagnostic and treatment of patients lead to poor treatment outcomes.

Ayire Adongo, Programme Coordinator for Sub-Saharan Africa said “Pharmacists are very important for the successful management of health conditions and we cannot succeed without this critical human resource for health. We are particularly grateful to the leadership of the Ghana College of Pharmacists for this opportunity to train Paediatric oncology pharmacists in Ghana, as well as their willingness to accept residents from other African countries in the future.“

World Child Cancer is grateful for the ongoing support of its partners – the UBS Optimus Foundation, The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO), Celgene, British Foreign School Society Hospital School Project and Love Your Melon, in collaboration with the Ghana Ministry of Health.

Together, we will continue to improve childhood cancer management in Ghana and across Sub Saharan Africa.

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