Side effects of chemotherapy

Chemotherapy drugs can cause unpleasant side effects. However, these are mostly temporary and there are often ways of controlling or reducing them.

The main areas of the body that are affected are those where normal cells rapidly divide and grow. These include cells in the mouth, the lining of the digestive system, the skin, hair follicles and the bone marrow. 

Different children will be affected by chemotherapy in different ways. Your child will not have all of the side effects described here but may have some of them. Your child’s doctor or nurse will tell you more about the side effects that are likely to occur during your child’s treatment, and ways of managing them.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

Some chemotherapy drugs lower the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow, so your child may become anaemic. This can make them feel very tired and breathless, and look pale. If the number of blood cells is very low, a blood transfusion can be given.

This information was written by the Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG).

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