Meeting Bangladesh's Nurses

Despite there being a huge strain on healthcare professionals throughout Bangladesh, nurses like Nulifa, Lakshmi and Tuhin are often overlooked and undervalued.

Nurses around the world play a pivotal role in caring for children with cancer. However, in Bangladesh the majority of nurses are female and a gender divide has meant their skills are dismissed despite the need for more support.

With better training we will have more skills to help others. We are always looking to learn more and improve the care we give to children and families.

World Child Cancer is changing this by empowering nurses. £83 pays for a nurse to attend a four-day training session, empowering them to utilise their skills to support children with cancer and equip them with the knowledge to train their colleagues. By donating £83 today, you will help nurses like Nulifa, Lakshmi and Tuhin to take better care of children with cancer.

The impossible job

We asked Nulifa what makes her wake up in the morning to do a near-impossible job. The answer was simple;

I feel very happy when a child is cured and goes home with a smile on their face. Caring for a child is the best thing for me.

Nurse Nulifa

Childhood cancer, if detected early enough, can be cured. As many as 80% of children with cancer survive in high income countries like the UK. This figure drops to as low as 10% in low and middle income countries like Bangladesh. Children of today are the leaders and pioneers of tomorrow. Children are currently dying of cancers that are curable – but with your support we can change this.

By donating today you will allow nurses like Nulifa, Lakshmi and Tuhin to not only provide even better care for children with cancer but also give them a voice in their community. Give before 30th June and your donation will be doubled by the UK government. Matched funding from the UK government will support children with cancer in Bangladesh whilst public donations will go towards supporting our other programmes in low and middle income countries around the world.

It’s a noble profession to do. We love being able to help and serve others. Serving people through our nursing is our religion, we are committed. That’s why I wanted to become a nurse.

Nurse Lakshmi

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Discover More Stories…

Tiwo’s story

Five years after developing cancer and two years of treatment later, six-year-old Tiwo is doing well

Read more

Hassan’s story

14-year-old Hassan from the Machinga district of Malawi was diagnosed with Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) last year.

Read more

Franklyn’s Story

Meet Franklyn, now 17, who is fully recovered from cancer and dreams of becoming a doctor to help others

Read more

Rebecca’s Success Story

Rebecca is now able to return to school after undergoing cancer treatment through World Child Cancer in Ghana

Read more

My road to recovery

Prince went on to become a childhood cancer advocate and help many other children just like him when he recovered from leukaemia. Read More

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Will you join us?

Together we can close the gap in childhood cancer care.

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